‘Neath Weighty Boughs She Sleeps


By Margot J. of Pidpenky
I think that I shall never see A poem lovely as a tree. A tree whose hungry mouth is prest Against the sweet earth's flowing breast, A tree that may in summer wear A nest of robins in her hair. - Joyce Kilmer
This forest is very old – immense trees stand silently, their boughs weighed down with time. The pathways are often hidden and dark, lost in the deep shadows of the woods. But one girl is very much at home here.

Drusilla loves the forest’s secret places, its knolls and crevices, its unexpected clearings where shafts of sunlight pierce through the leafy canopy above. She knows its quiet residents, the birds and animals her friends and companions.

This is just a preview. To read and see more, buy a copy of The Enchanted Forest in print or digital format.
‘Neath Weighty Boughs She Sleeps
The Enchanted Forest

Antiquing Fabric: Tea Dyeing


By Nicole Fallon

Materials:
  • Large ceramic or metal bowl
  • Black tea bags (these don't have to be expensive tea!)
  • Fabric (can be any reasonably light colour, or try a patterned floral with a light background)
  • Kettle
  • Tongs

1. Select the fabrics you wish to tea dye. Fabrics made from natural fibres, such as cotton, silk, or linen, work best. Man-made fibres may come out unexpectedly or not take the tea dye at all.

2. Boil enough water to fill your bowl about three-quarters full. Remove any paper tags from your tea bags.  Add five or six bags to the water and let the tea steep.

This is just a preview. To read and see more, buy a copy of The Enchanted Forest in print or digital format.
Antiquing Fabric: Tea Dyeing
The Enchanted Forest

Hansel and Gretel: Into the Woods


By Marta
The world's a forest, in which all lose their way; though by a different path each goes astray. - George Villiers
Hansel and Gretel is a familiar fairy tale that many of us grew up with. It is German in origin and was written down by the Brothers Grimm in the early nineteenth century.

The story tells the tale of Hansel and Gretel, the only children of a woodcutter. Not only is the family poor, but a great famine has struck the land.  It is the woodcutter’s second wife, Hansel and Gretel’s stepmother, who concocts a wicked scheme to get rid of the children. She plans to lead them deep into the woods so they will become permanently lost, leaving two fewer mouths to feed in the family.

This is just a preview. To read and see more, buy a copy of The Enchanted Forest in print or digital format.
Hansel and Gretel: Into the Woods
The Enchanted Forest

Givenchy’s Garden


By Rosey Kaes
In my garden there is a large place for sentiment.  My garden of flowers is also my garden of thoughts and dreams.  The thoughts grow as freely as the flowers, and the dreams are as beautiful. - Abram L. Urban
Givenchy is a soft-spoken dreamer who lives in a tiny, ground-floor apartment in Paris. She loves sitting in her tiny but lush garden in the early evenings, nibbling on macarons and sipping a dry white wine.

The romance of the city of lights sustains her while she struggles to achieve her dream as a fashion designer. She loves to design and sew her own clothing that mixes the best of haute couture with a dreamy, romantic style.

This is just a preview. To read and see more, buy a copy of The Enchanted Forest in print or digital format.
Givenchy’s Garden
The Enchanted Forest

Who’s Afraid of the Big, Bad Wolf?


By Rosey Kaes

Rosey took up beading and embroidery just recently, in January, 2011. This project, Little Red, is the fourth in her Fairy Tale Series, which also includes works inspired by Cinderella, and The Little Mermaid. She is greatly inspired by stories, and has also drawn from classic children’s literature, such as Alice in Wonderland and The Wizard of Oz.

Rosey typically begins with a sketch and starts to select the materials for the piece: the background fabric and the general color palette she’ll use. Working with an embroidery hoop, Rosey first applies the basic elements of the scene, cut from felt. These are carefully stitched to the background fabric.

This is just a preview. To read and see more, buy a copy of The Enchanted Forest in print or digital format.
Who’s Afraid of the Big, Bad Wolf?
The Enchanted Forest

Lord of the Forest


By Nicole Fallon
This is what I believe: That I am I. That my soul is a dark forest. That my known self will never be more than a little clearing in the forest. That gods, strange gods, come forth from the forest into the clearing of my known self, and then go back. - D.H. Lawrence
Silvanus, the Green Man, Pan, Oberon – these are all names given to the “Lord of the Forest” or guardian of the woods. Sometimes he is a towering horned god, sometimes a faun with goat’s legs and hooves, or sometimes just a face made out of leaves. Other times he is the young hunter or the splendid fairy king.

In all his incarnations he is a deity of wild, wooded places, the god of nature. He abides and moves among the trees and presides over all the denizens of the forest. He communes with each creature, from the largest stag to the smallest butterfly.

This is just a preview. To read and see more, buy a copy of The Enchanted Forest in print or digital format.
Lord of the Forest
The Enchanted Forest

A Whisper of Wings


By Chantelle Schriver
The butterfly counts not months but moments, and has time enough.- Rabindranath Tagore
Once a long time ago, the forest was full of magical creatures, but over the centuries, many have left this mystical place. Now only the butterflies remain - like brilliant jewels amid the trees and ferns. To glimpse one is truly rare, for they are very shy creatures, and is said to bring great joy and happiness...

Many of us love to escape into tales of other lands and other worlds, and fairies are often a whimsical and integral part of fantasy stories. They are fleeting and fickle creatures, almost seeming to occupy a space in between this world and the other-world.

This is just a preview. To read and see more, buy a copy of The Enchanted Forest in print or digital format.
A Whisper of Wings
The Enchanted Forest

Make Your Own Butterfly Tiara


By Elzaim

1. Gather your supplies. You will need:
A doll, a ruler, wire in whatever color you prefer (you will need both 18 gauge and 26 gauge), paper and pencil, one small "drop" bead, wire cutters, and one pair each of round-nose and flat-nose pliers.

2. Sketch your desired piece.
Roughly sketch what you want your finished piece to look like.

This is just a preview. To read and see more, buy a copy of The Enchanted Forest in print or digital format.
Make Your Own Butterfly Tiara
The Enchanted Forest

Mori Girl


By Jacqueline Brum
As you sit on the hillside, or lie prone under the trees of the forest, or sprawl wet-legged by a mountain stream, the great door, that does not look like a door, opens. - Stephen Graham
Despite her urban hipster style, Briar has always been an outdoorsy girl at heart. Enjoying the calm of long hikes through the autumn leaves, today she ventured deeper into the forest than usual.

Suddenly she realized she had become turned around somewhere along the path. In fact, she couldn’t make out the path behind her at all! “Always getting lost in my thoughts,” she chastised herself. “Never paying attention to what’s around me. How am I going to get my bearings and get home?”

Just as panic was starting to get the better of her, she noticed a pair of playful, almost alien-looking eyes peeking out at her through the foliage. The figure stepped forward and Briar looked in wonder the strangest yet sweetest looking little girl she had ever seen. “Well, hello there little one. Are you lost too?” she asked.

This is just a preview. To read and see more, buy a copy of The Enchanted Forest in print or digital format.
Mori Girl
The Enchanted Forest
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